The limits of markets.

Michael Sandel, professor of political philosophy at Harvard, lists in The Atlantic an array of absurd examples of capitalism and commodification gone crazy, from paying kids to read and adults to fight in Somalia, to upgrading prison cells for $90. He argues:

While it is certainly true that greed played a role in the financial crisis, something bigger was and is at stake. The most fateful change that unfolded during the past three decades was not an increase in greed. It was the reach of markets, and of market values, into spheres of life traditionally governed by nonmarket norms. To contend with this condition, we need to do more than inveigh against greed; we need to have a public debate about where markets belong—and where they don’t…

[The use] of markets to allocate health, education, public safety, national security, criminal justice, environmental protection, recreation, procreation, and other social goods were for the most part unheard-of 30 years ago. Today, we take them largely for granted.

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